Audio: Following the Text

By David Wood (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By David Wood (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
Your Relationship with Your Bible
1 Corinthians 11:4-6
Matthew Raley (2-22-15)

In our current series we are studying one of the most controversial passages in the New Testament, and we are learning how to understand and interpret the Scriptures in the process.

One of the biggest problems in your relationship with your Bible is how distant the books are culturally. There are barriers of time, language, and custom. Sometimes it can be difficult to reconstruct what a word meant, what a specific practice was, or even where a place was.

Some people think this is only a problem in some passages. In fact, we misinterpret Scripture so often because this is a problem in every passage. We have to learn to carefully follow the reasoning of the text. Like following a narrow trail on a cliff, there are many ways to go wrong but only one way to get it right, and that is to stay on the trail.

In today’s message we will tackle the barrier of culture in our understanding of this text.

To follow along with the sermon outline, right click on the link below and select “Open link in new tab.”

February 22, 2015 Bulletin Outline

 

 

Audio: Listening to the Text

Listening for Movement in the Mine, by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) from USA, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
Listening for Movement in the Mine, by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) from USA, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Your Relationship with Your Bible
1 Corinthians 11:2-3
Matthew Raley (2-15-15)

In our current series we are learning how to understand and interpret the Scriptures using one of the most controversial passages in the New Testament as our case in point.

In today’s passage we read about a husband being the head of a wife, a woman being the glory of a man, and we are shocked. We launch into all sorts of questions: “Why does Paul hate women? Why is he attacking the Corinthians over this? Why do women have to be subordinate to men? Do we really have to dress a certain way for worship?” Our habit is to let these questions drive our reading of the text. As a result, we have likely missed the point of this passage.

Such questions are off-topic. They come from our ignoring verses 2-3. If we want to receive what the text has to say, we have to listen to what it is telling us.

To follow along with the sermon notes, right click on the link below and select “Open link in new tab.”

February 15, 2015 Sermon Bulletin Outline

Audio: Setting off Our Alarms

Bible 1 CorinthiansYour Relationship with Your Bible
1 Corinthians 11:2-16
Matthew Raley (2-8-15)

This passage about the dress and behavior of men and women in public worship sets off all our alarms. In post-feminist society, the hierarchies Paul talks about cannot be squared with our ideas of equality. Even the concepts of male and female themselves are being questioned today.

Beyond this, as we read we wonder what Paul’s reasoning really is here. If we are called to hold views that the people around us despise, we need to know exactly what ground we’re standing on.

Further, we wonder about the practical impact of this passage? How are we supposed to apply it today? Does it apply at all? If so, does it apply exactly as written, or with modifications?

In the series we are beginning this morning, we’re going to move slowly through these verses. I will explain in much more detail how I work through this passage. I want you to see what God says and submit your consciences to him. For you to do that, I need to show you the difference between fact and interpretation. I also need to show you how to weigh interpretations.

To follow along with the sermon notes, right click on the link below and select “Open link in new tab.”

February 8, 2015 Sermon Bulletin Outline

Audio: Confronting the New Islamic Terrorism

wood-cross-1117132-mA Christian Response
Romans 12.18
Matthew Raley (2-1-15)

The lone Islamic terrorist is becoming one the biggest threats to our security. Last October 24th, the New York Times documented 5 attacks since September—attacks on four police officers in New York that day, on the Canadian parliament the day before, on a Canadian solider three days before that, the beheading of a woman in Oklahoma in September, and the attempt to coordinate attacks in Australia. The article listed 6 more between June 2009 and May 2014, including the shootings at Fort Hood.

A few weeks after that article appeared, on December 16th, an Islamic terrorist took hostages in a Sydney café. Three were killed. And between January 7th and 9th terrorists killed 17 people in France.

All of this occurs in the horrific context of the rising Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, the Taliban in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and Boko Haram in Nigeria.

In today’s message we will see that Paul commands us to be at peace with all people so far as it depends on us (Roman 12.18). He is talking about the peace of civil society, which is a good for all, not just for us. The question we will be asking this morning is, what specifically does that mean for us right now?

To follow along with the sermon notes, right click on the link below and select “Open link in new tab.”

February 1, 2015 Bulletin Outline

Audio: The Prayerful Community

lightstock_62225_smallHow the Gospel Becomes Real
Philemon 4-7, 21-22
Matthew Raley (1-25-15)

Consider the impossibility of what the early Christians attempted to do. They wanted to unite Jews and Gentiles, men and women, slaves and free. They wanted an international movement that united cities in a common mission. Our mission is just as impossible. To build community in Christ, our hearts have to be united at a deep level. Every sort of barrier stands between us and that goal: busyness, desires, personalities, and not least sin. In today’s sermon we will see that we can only achieve this goal through prayer.

To follow along with the sermon notes, right click on the link below and select “Open link in new tab.” Sermon Notes 1-25-15

Audio: A Life of Shared Service

Flight deck personnel work together whil -rigging a -aircraft barricade during flight deck drills aboard th -Nimitz-class aircraft-carrier USS Harry S. Truman. Image via Wikimedia Commons
Flight deck personnel work together while rigging an aircraft barricade during flight deck drills aboard the Nimitz class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman. Image via Wikimedia Commons

How the Gospel Becomes Real
Philemon 8-22
Matthew Raley (1-18-15)

How do people come to Christ? We tend to think of evangelism as either a big event, like a stadium filled with people for a concert or an evangelist, or we think of it on a very small scale, one person alone with another person trying to convince them of Christ.

In today’s message we will see that what brings people to Christ is the community of believers around them—a community that shows what the love of Christ looks like. Paul’s letter to Philemon shows us how to build a community that wins people to Christ through a life of shared service.

To follow along with sermon notes, right click on the link below and select “Open link in new tab.”

Sermon Notes 1-18-15

 

Audio: Foundations for an Open Life

Jewish Market on the East  Side, New York, NY between 1890-1901. Detroit Publishing Co. Courtesy of Library of Congress
Jewish Market on the East Side, New York, NY between 1890-1901. Detroit Publishing Co. Courtesy of Library of Congress

How the Gospel Becomes Real
Philemon 8-22
Matthew Raley (1-11-15)

When people lock their doors and windows, there’s trouble in the neighborhood. But when the neighborhood is safe, people open their doors. What are the foundations for this kind of openness?

Here at Chico Grace Brethren we’re building community through Real Life Groups: small groups that make the gospel real. Our model is Paul’s letter to Philemon. One look at this letter shows how important the small group is in the life of the Church, and also how the early churches were characterized by openness. In today’s message we will look at three foundations for building an open life which can be seen in this story.

 

Please note: the audio quality is somewhat poor for the first minute of the recording, but improves after that.

To follow along with the sermon notes, right click on the link below and select “Open link in new tab.”

Sermon Notes 1-11-15