Audio: The Bible’s Spirituality for Sexual Life

Sexuality and Hope in Christ
1 Corinthians 6:17-20
Matthew Raley (4-6-14)

This week in our ongoing study of 1 Corinthians, we continue looking at what Paul has to say to the church about sexuality. What we have seen so far in this series is that sexuality in the Bible’s teaching is inherently spiritual. What you do with your body you also do with your spirit. To understand this spirituality, we need to understand the principle of redemption taught in today’s passage.

Paul says, “You are not your own.” There is no autonomy for human beings, and Christians in particular do not own their bodies. “For you were bought with a price.”  The cross transformed sinners by washing, sanctifying, and justifying them. Since they have been bought with this price, the Corinthians have a duty to glorify God with their bodies. When we understand this principle of redemption, we can understand Paul’s description of the spirituality of sexual life.  In today’s message we will see how it is that  the work of the cross is fulfilled even in our most intimate experiences.


To follow along with the sermon notes, right click on the link below and select “Open link in new tab.”

Sermon Notes 4-6-14

Video: The Bible’s Spirituality for Sexual Life

Sexuality and Hope in Christ
1 Corinthians 6:17-20
Matthew Raley (4-6-14)

This week in our ongoing study of 1 Corinthians, we continue looking at what Paul has to say to the church about sexuality. What we have seen so far in this series is that sexuality in the Bible’s teaching is inherently spiritual. What you do with your body you also do with your spirit. To understand this spirituality, we need to understand the principle of redemption taught in today’s passage.

Paul says, “You are not your own.” There is no autonomy for human beings, and Christians in particular do not own their bodies. “For you were bought with a price.” The cross transformed sinners by washing, sanctifying, and justifying them. Since they have been bought with this price, the Corinthians have a duty to glorify God with their bodies. When we understand this principle of redemption, we can understand Paul’s description of the spirituality of sexual life. In today’s message we will see how it is that the work of the cross is fulfilled even in our most intimate experiences.

Audio: The Whole Sexual Person, Part 2

Who am I? (“The Game of Probabilities,” Oscar Munoz, 2007, MoMA.)

Sexuality and Hope in Christ
1 Corinthians 6:14-16
Matthew Raley (3-30-14)

Last week we saw that sexuality involves your whole person. Paul teaches that there is no division between your personality, your spirituality, and your body. We cannot reduce sexuality to something that is “just physical.”

In today’s message, we will take one simple step forward: If sexuality involves your whole person, then your sexual activity involves someone else’s whole person. Biblical sexuality is founded on this simple step. Once we admit that sex involves the whole person, we are bound either to devalue persons or to respect persons.

The problem today is that our society is operating with two contradictory principles. One is that sex is “just physical.” The other is that sexual life is what defines us as people. We operate this way because it enables us to choose what moral principle we’re following based on what we desire. Christians are operating this way too.

Paul’s words in our text will help us straighten out this contradiction. Then we will have to make a choice.


To follow along with the sermon notes, right click on the link below and select “Open in a new tab”.

Sermon Notes 3-30-14

Video: The Whole Sexual Person, Part 2

Sexuality and Hope in Christ
1 Corinthians 6:14-16
Matthew Raley (3-30-14)

Last week we saw that sexuality involves your whole person. Paul teaches that there is no division between your personality, your spirituality, and your body. We cannot reduce sexuality to something that is “just physical.”

In today’s message, we will take one simple step forward: If sexuality involves your whole person, then your sexual activity involves someone else’s whole person. Biblical sexuality is founded on this simple step. Once we admit that sex involves the whole person, we are bound either to devalue persons or to respect persons.

The problem today is that our society is operating with two contradictory principles. One is that sex is “just physical.” The other is that sexual life is what defines us as people. We operate this way because it enables us to choose what moral principle we’re following based on what we desire. Christians are operating this way too.

Paul’s words in our text will help us straighten out this contradiction. Then we will have to make a choice.

Audio: The Whole Sexual Person, Part 1

Is the “real me” hiding behind my body? (“Face and Hands,” Fernand Leger, 1952, MoMA.)

Sexuality and Hope in Christ
1 Corinthians 6:12-13
Matthew Raley (3-23-14)

Paul tells the Corinthians that their identities have changed. They used to be identified as sinners—an identity that expressed itself in various lifestyles. But now they are identified by their calling in Christ. In that new identity, they have been washed, sanctified, and justified by Christ on the cross and the Holy Spirit living in them.

Identity is a super-heated issue today. This makes our calling in Christ more important than ever, especially in relation to how we understand our bodies. Is my body something I’m supposed to overcome? Is “the real me” supposed to be freed from the prison of my body? What does it mean to be at peace with who I am in my body? Who am I, and from what do I derive my identity?  Do I have wholeness, or am I broken up into pieces – compartmentalized? 

In today’s message we will seek to answer these questions and learn how to view our bodies from the perspective of our new identity in Christ.


To follow along with the sermon notes while the audio plays, simply right click on the link below and select “Open link in new tab.”

Sermon notes 3-23-14

 

Video: The Whole Sexual Person, Part 1

Sexuality and Hope in Christ
1 Corinthians 6:12-13
Matthew Raley (3-23-14)

Paul tells the Corinthians that their identities have changed. They used to be identified as sinners—an identity that expressed itself in various lifestyles. But now they are identified by their calling in Christ. In that new identity, they have been washed, sanctified, and justified by Christ on the cross and the Holy Spirit living in them.

Identity is a superheated issue today. This makes our calling in Christ more important than ever, especially in relation to how we understand our bodies. Is my body something I’m supposed to overcome? Is “the real me” supposed to be freed from the prison of my body? What does it mean to be at peace with who I am in my body? Who am I, and from what do I derive my identity? Do I have wholeness, or am I broken up into pieces – compartmentalized?

In today’s message we will seek to answer these questions and learn how to view our bodies from the perspective of our new identity in Christ.

Audio: Christ’s Standard for Sexuality

Sweeping out the leaven. (“Broom,” Yoram Lehman, 1973, MoMA.)

Sexuality and Hope in Christ
1 Corinthians 5.6 – 6:11
Matthew Raley (3-16-14)

This week, in our latest series drawn from 1 Corinthians, we continue looking at what Paul has to say to the church about sexuality.

What is the standard Christ uses for who is “in” and who is “out?” The standard might be that if you break any of the sexual rules, you’re “out,” and you have the burden of getting back “in.” Or the standard might be that there are no such things as “in” and “out” anymore. The rules simply don’t matter.

American Christians seem to swing between these two extremes in what I am calling a Pharisee spiral. This morning, we’re going to listen closely to what Paul is really arguing in this passage. There is a clear, strong standard that Christ uses for sexuality. He uses it to lead us into new life – a life with Christ at its center.


Follow along with the sermon notes by right-clicking on the link and selecting the option: “Open link in new tab.”

Sermon Notes: March 16, 2014

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